Cambodian-Born US Politician Joins Prison Protest

November 24, 2014

By:  CHRIS MUELLER AND MECH DARA, The Cambodia Daily, 24 November 2014

Three weeks after becoming the first Cambodian-American legislator in the U.S., Rady Mom joined hundreds of protesters in Phnom Penh on Sunday to demand the release of 17 imprisoned activists, opposition figures and monks from Prey Sar prison.

Mr. Mom, 45, who was elected as a Massachusetts state representative in the November 4 U.S. midterm elections, arrived in Cambodia last week for a two-week visit to the country.

Dar Rachana, 12, protests outside Phnom Penh's Prey Sar prison on Sunday while holding a poster of her grandmother, Nget Khun, who, along with six fellow activists from the Boeng Kak community, was sentenced to a year in prison on November 11. (Satoshi Takahashi)

Dar Rachana, 12, protests outside Phnom Penh’s Prey Sar prison on Sunday while holding a poster of her grandmother, Nget Khun, who, along with six fellow activists from the Boeng Kak community, was sentenced to a year in prison on November 11. (Satoshi Takahashi)

 

“I feel pity for my brothers and sisters,” a visibly upset Mr. Mom told some 200 protesters outside the maximum-security prison before passing the microphone to his spokesman, Khem Chantha.

“We call, through newspapers and the media, for the government to release our brothers and sisters,” Mr. Chantha told the crowd. “Their crimes are not really serious—blocking traffic is not a penal offense.”

Seven activists from the embattled Boeng Kak community were sentenced to one year in prison on November 11 after being convicted under the Traffic Law of obstructing traffic after they placed a bed frame in the middle of Monivong Boulevard. The stunt was intended to bring attention to flooding in their neighborhood.

The protesters and Mr. Mom hoped to meet with the 17 prisoners—a group that includes 11 activists, three CNRP figures and three monks—but were not allowed to enter the detention facility.

Anti-eviction activist Yorm Bopha, also from the Boeng Kak community, said that while disappointed at not being allowed inside, the protesters were heartened by Mr. Mom’s presence Sunday.

“His support encourages and inspires us to fight for justice, and shows we are not alone,” Ms. Bopha said. “We were happy to see him participate with us to demand the release of the 17 who have been unjustly imprisoned.”

Prior to joining Sunday’s demonstration, Mr. Mom met with Prime Minister Hun Sen on Thursday and opposition leader Sam Rainsy on Saturday. He plans to meet with a number of other CPP and CNRP officials throughout the next week and a half.

While visiting a school inside Phnom Penh’s Svay Pope pagoda Sunday afternoon, Mr. Mom said that despite taking part in the morning’s demonstration, the purpose of his trip was not political.

“The first [reason] was to have a little bit of vacation time,” he said. “I also really wanted to have a connection—see the country where I was born—from a different point of view.”

Mr. Mom said his meeting with Mr. Hun Sen last week was a way for him to view Cambodia through the eyes of the man who has ruled the country for nearly 30 years.

“[The meeting] was to meet a man, a prime minister, who runs this great nation…to get a little bit of insight on how he sees the country,” he said.

Massachusetts state representative-elect Rady Mom speaks to reporters at a school inside Phnom Penh's Svay Pope pagoda Sunday. (Neou Vannarin/The Cambodia Daily)

Massachusetts state representative-elect Rady Mom speaks to reporters at a school inside Phnom Penh’s Svay Pope pagoda Sunday. (Neou Vannarin/The Cambodia Daily)

When asked if his view of the prime minister had changed after speaking with protesters and opposition lawmakers—who accuse Mr. Hun Sen’s government of orchestrating some of the arrests—Mr. Mom said he did not know enough about the political situation to comment.

“I don’t’ know the whole story of all that,” Mr. Mom said. “I’m more concerned [about] where I came from.”

Mr. Mom was elected this month as the state representative for the 18th Middlesex district in Lowell, Massachusetts. Lowell has the U.S.’s second largest Cambodian-American population, numbering about 30,000.

Mr. Mom arrived in the U.S. with his family in 1982 after fleeing the Khmer Rouge regime and spending several years in a Thai refugee camp.

On Sunday, Mr. Mom said he hopes his story will inspire not only his constituents, but young Cambodians as well.

“I went to the States in 1982 without a word of English,” he said. “I want to inspire men and women…whether that’s in the States or here, to inspire them to step up, take pride in what they want to see changed. Don’t just scream out, but step up and do something about it.”

 


UN Envoy, NGOs Rebuke Gov’t Over Recent Spate of Arrests

November 19, 2014

By: Kuch Naren , The Cambodia Daily, 19 November 2014

The U.N.’s human rights envoy to Cambodia on Tuesday joined a group of local NGOs in criticizing a spate of recent arrests of activists, monks and opposition figures.

Ten female land rights activists, three Buddhist monks and two opposition CNRP figures were all arrested last week. Of the 15, the Phnom Penh Municipal Court has already convicted 11 of them in two snap trials, sentencing them each to a year in jail.

Anti-eviction activist Yorm Bopha and other residents of Phnom Penh's Boeng Kak neighborhood protest outside the British Embassy on Tuesday. (Satoshi Takahashi)

Anti-eviction activist Yorm Bopha and other residents of Phnom Penh’s Boeng Kak neighborhood protest outside the British Embassy on Tuesday. (Satoshi Takahashi)

U.N. envoy Surya Subedi on Tuesday urged the government to respect the law while calling on the country’s courts to exercise their authority independent of outside influences.

“It saddens me to see the courts being used again and again as a tool of the executive,” he said in a statement. “The lack of judicial independence is one of the central obstacles to achieving the just, inclusive society that Cambodians strive for.”

“Those who seek to exercise fundamental freedoms can be arrested, charged and convicted, on little or no material grounds. For such cases, justice in the heavily backlogged judicial system can be remarkably swift,” Mr. Subedi added.

Six NGOs also held a press conference Tuesday to condemn the arrests, calling the government’s crackdown on its critics a serious human rights violation.

Latt Khy, who heads the land and livelihoods program for rights group Adhoc, said the courts were clearly under political pressure as the charges brought against the activists were “baseless.”

“We, the civil society groups, believe all the people arrested, convicted, and imprisoned did not commit wrongdoing as charged,” he said.

Son Chum Chuon, program director for the Khmer Kampuchea Krom for Human Rights and Development Association, said the forced defrocking and imprisonment of three ethnic Khmer Krom monks was a violation of Buddhist principles and had left many Khmer Krom activists fearful of joining any more protests.

“The arrest and detention of the three Khmer Krom monks is a move to crack down on activists to prevent them from participating in social work,” he said.

The Khmer Krom hail from what is present-day southern Vietnam. Many of those living in Cambodia feel colonial France unjustly ceded the area to Vietnam and advocate for its return to Cambodia.

Suon Bunsak, executive director of the Cambodian Human Rights Action Committee, said the groups would seek a meeting with lawmakers from the National Assembly’s human rights commission to push for the immediate release of those jailed last week.

On Tuesday morning, about 200 supporters of those arrested marched to 15 embassies to bring attention to their plight. They submitted petitions to the U.S. Embassy, the European Union delegation and offices of the U.N. asking them to put pressure on the Cambodian government to release the group.

 


At the speed of ‘justice’

November 12, 2014

By: Khouth Sophak Chakrya,Phnom Penh Post, 12 November 2014

Muncipal security guards arrest an activist Buddhist monk during a protest in front of Phnom Penh Municipal Court yesterday. AFP

Seven Boeung Kak lake activists, all of them women, were convicted and sentenced to one year in prison yesterday – just a day after being arrested during a protest. Five of them were members of the so-called “Boeung Kak 13” imprisoned in similar circumstances in 2012.

Yesterday’s decision sparked outrage from rights groups, who drew comparisons to that case.

“I sentence them each to one year in prison and fine them 2 million riel [about $500],” Phnom Penh Municipal Court judge Mong Mony Sorphea announced after a trial that lasted less than four hours.

The women’s case began at about 3pm after they were charged under Article 78 of the Traffic Law for using a wooden bed to block Monivong Boulevard outside Phnom Penh’s City Hall. The penalties are the maximum that can be given under the law.

The seven are Tep Vanny, Nget Khun, Kong Chantha, Bo Chhorvy, Phan Chhunreth, Norng Sreng and Song Srey Leap.

Vanny, Khun, Chantha, Chhunreth and Srey Leap were among the 13 imprisoned for more than a month after a whirlwind three-hour trial in 2012. On that occasion, they had been arrested two days earlier for protesting.

Sia Phearum, secretariat director of the Housing Rights Task Force, said he was shocked at yesterday’s trial and verdict. He added that he felt ashamed at how his country’s courts were acting.

“Cambodia’s courts are not justice for all, they are not independent,” he said. “The government is using the courts. The courts have no spirit.”

The defendants yesterday gave testimony but presented no witnesses. During her brief statement, Vanny admitted that the activists had brought the bed to the protest.

“We carried it as a symbol that our homes and villages have flooded and we have nowhere to stay,” she said. “But we did not block traffic.”

Nhem Sao Nol, Daun Penh police deputy chief, disagreed when giving evidence for the prosecution. The protesters had intentionally caused a traffic jam, he said.

A traffic police officer who gave testimony accused the defendants of climbing up and hanging from a crane.

After just a few hours, the prosecutor, Seang Sok, said that the court had seen enough to convict the women.

“According to the evidence, including videos and photos that show illegal activity, I ask the judge to punish them,” he said.

When the judge handed down his verdict, cries of “injustice” could be heard from the women.

“Why did you open this hearing if you are just going to listen to the accusations and give us the maximum penalty?” Vanny screamed.

Ham Sunrith, the women’s lawyer, said that under the strike law, the women had every right to peacefully demonstrate.

“Authorities can … temporarily arrest them until the protest disperses, but they cannot imprison them,” he said.

Am Sam Ath, from rights group Licadho, said his NGO deeply regretted the verdict.

Security guards arrest a land-rights activist from Boeung Kak lakeside community during a protest in front of the municipal court yesterday. AFP

“The people need the authorities to help,” he said, referring to the flooding that villagers blame on the filling in of Boeung Kak lake. “This is their response.”

Four other people – three activists and Suen Hai, a monk – were arrested outside the court during a morning protest.

The Boeung Kak community has battled authorities for years over the eviction of thousands of families to make way for a government-linked development that has yet to materialise.

Only several dozen families are still waiting for land titles owed to them after Prime Minister Hun Sen in 2011 reclaimed part of the concession awarded to ruling party Senator Lao Meng Khin’s Shukaku company in 2007.

One of those imprisoned yesterday, Nget Khun, a woman in her seventies, last month watched municipal authorities mark out land for her long-awaited title.

“I won’t stop protesting until City Hall resolves the land disputes for all the families in Boeung Kak,” she said at the time. She has yet to receive the document.

Protesters, led by Vanny, have broadened their activism to encompass a range of disputes, earning them the contemptuous title of “professional protesters” from authorities.

Just last week, Vanny and others were involved in a protest in Koh Kong province supporting villagers in dispute with Ly Yong Phat’s Special Economic Zone, blocking a busy bridge before a clash with police.

When the Boeung Kak 13 were released, their convictions remained. Their sentences, all at least two years, were suspended. This led rights groups, including Licadho and the HRTF, to suggest the women remained “at continued threat of re-arrest”.

Despite this, many have continued to protest. Four of those convicted yesterday – Vanny, Chhunreth, Chhorvy and Srey Leap – were briefly arrested in January during a ban on public demonstrations.

The 13’s imprisonment in 2012 earned the government a large dose of criticism and gained international attention. Less than two weeks before the group’s appeal, Hillary Clinton, then US Secretary of State, used a private meeting to urge Foreign Minister Hor Namhong to release the women.

Phearum, from HRTF, said he hoped similar support would be shown over coming days and weeks.

“It will begin with Cambodians and then spread,” he said.

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY SHANE WORRELL


One-year jail terms for B Kak protesters

November 11, 2014

By: Khouth Sophak Chakrya,Phnom Penh Post, 11 November 2014

District security guards arrest a Boeung Kak land rights activist in front of Phnom Penh Municipal Court on Tuesday as she protests the previous day’s arrest of seven fellow activists. Those seven were sentenced to one-year jail sentences in little more than 24 hours after their arrests. AFP

SEVEN Boeung Kak lake activists, all of them women, have been convicted and sentenced to one year in jail – just a day after being arrested during a protest.

Five of the group were members of the so-called “Boeung Kak 13” imprisoned in similar circumstances in 2012.

“I sentence them each to one year in prison and fine them 2 million riel (about $500),” the presiding Phnom Penh Municipal Court judge told the courtroom.

The seven women stood trial this afternoon after being charged under Article 78 of the traffic law just hours earlier for allegedly blocking Monivong Boulevard outside City Hall in Phnom Penh yesterday.

The seven are Tep Vanny, Nget Khun, Kong Chantha, Bo Chhorvy, Phan Chhunreth, Norng Sreng and Song Srey Leap.

Of those, Vanny, Khun, Chantha, Chhunreth and Srey Leap were among 13 imprisoned for more than a month for protesting in 2012.

Four other people – three activists and Suen Hai, a monk from Stung Meanchey pagoda – were arrested this morning outside the municipal court during a protest calling for the group’s release.

Activists convicted in one day trial

Protesters also made their presence known outside the US Embassy.

During Monday’s protest at City Hall, protesters blocked the road, demanding authorities fix the sewage system in their villages to prevent flooding.
“Our houses get flooded every time it rains and . . . we worry about electric shock,” Vanny said before her arrest.

The community has battled authorities for years over the eviction of thousands of families from Boeung Kak to make way for a government-linked development that has yet to materialise.

Several dozen families are still waiting for land titles owed to them after Prime Minister Hun Sen in 2011 reclaimed part of the concession awarded to ruling party Senator Lao Meng Khin’s Shukaku company in 2007.


ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក​បន្ត​ផ្អាក​ផ្តល់​សម្បទាន​ហិរញ្ញវត្ថុ​ដល់​កម្ពុជា​ដោយសារ​បញ្ហា​ជម្លោះ​ដីធ្លី

October 22, 2014

ដោយៈ យន់ សាមៀន,អាស៊ីសេរី, ថ្ងៃទី ២២​ ខែ តុលា ឆ្នាំ ២០១៤

ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក បឹងកក់ ៦១០

ក្រុម​អ្នក​មាន​បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី ពិសេស​អ្នក​បឹងកក់ តវ៉ា​នៅ​ខាង​មុខ​ការិយាល័យ​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក កាល​ពី​ថ្ងៃ​ទី​១៦ មិថុនា ២០១៤។

ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក (World Bank) អះអាង​ថា ធនាគារ​នេះ​បន្ត​ផ្អាក​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​អភិវឌ្ឍន៍​ដល់​កម្ពុជា ដោយសារ​តែ​បញ្ហា​ជម្លោះ​ដីធ្លី​នៅ​កម្ពុជា។ ធនាគារ​ក៏​សន្យា​នឹង​តាម​ដាន​ស្ថានភាព​ជម្លោះ​ដីធ្លី​នៅ​តំបន់​បឹងកក់ និង​បន្ត​ពិភាក្សា​បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី​ជាមួយ​កម្ពុជា និង​ជាមួយ​បណ្ដា​អង្គការ​ក្រៅ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ផ្សេងៗ​ទៀត។

ការ​ប្រកាស​គោល​ជំហរ​របស់​ធនាគារ​នេះ ធ្វើ​ឡើង​ក្រោយ​ពេល​មេធាវី​អន្តរជាតិ ដែល​មាន​មូលដ្ឋាន​នៅ​សហរដ្ឋ​អាមេរិក បាន​ដាក់​ញត្តិ​ទៅ​ធនាគារ ទទូច​អោយ​បន្ត​ផ្អាក​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ទៅ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា រហូត​ដល់​មាន​ដំណោះស្រាយ​ជម្លោះ​ដីធ្លី​ទូទាំង​ប្រទេស​សមស្រប​មួយ។

នាយក​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក ប្រចាំ​តំបន់​អាស៊ី​អាគ្នេយ៍ លោក យូរ៉ិច ហ្សាចៅ (ULRICH ZACHAU) បាន​ស្នើ​លិខិត​មួយ​ច្បាប់​ទៅ​មេធាវី​អាមេរិកាំង លោក មូរតុន ក្លា (Morton Sklar) ដោយ​បញ្ជាក់​ថា ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក បន្ត​ផ្អាក​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ដល់​កម្ពុជា។ លិខិត​ផ្ញើ​ទៅ​កាន់ លោក មូរតុន ក្លា ចុះ​ថ្ងៃ​ទី​១៧ តុលា បញ្ជាក់​ថា សមាគម​ផ្តល់​ជំនួយ​អន្តរជាតិ​របស់​ធនាគារ​មិន​ទាន់​បាន​ពិចារណា​សម្រេច​ ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ទៅ​ដល់​កម្ពុជា នៅ​ឡើយ​ទេ។

លោក យូរ៉ិច ហ្សាចៅ បន្ត​ទៀត​ថា ការ​សន្យា​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ណា​មួយ​នោះ តម្រូវ​ឲ្យ​មាន​កិច្ច​ពិភាក្សា​ច្រើន​ជាមួយ​នឹង​ភាគី​ដៃគូ​អភិវឌ្ឍន៍​ទាំង​ ឡាយ។ ធនាគារ​នេះ​នឹង​បន្ត​ទទួល​យក​អនុសាសន៍ និង​ការ​ចូលរួម​ដោះស្រាយ​ទាំង​ឡាយ​ពី​សំណាក់​សង្គម​ស៊ីវិល។ លោក​ថា ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក នឹង​បន្ត​តាម​ដាន​ស្ថានភាព​នៅ​តំបន់​បឹងកក់ ហើយ​នឹង​សន្យា​បន្ត​ជួយ​កម្ពុជា ដើម្បី​ដោះស្រាយ​បញ្ហា​ប្រឈម​ក្នុង​កិច្ចការ​អភិវឌ្ឍន៍។

មេធាវី​អាមេរិកាំង តំណាង​ឲ្យ​ជន​រងគ្រោះ​នៃ​ការ​រំលោភ​ដីធ្លី​នៅ​កម្ពុជា លោក មូរតុន ក្លា បាន​ដាក់​ញត្តិ​ទៅ​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក កាល​ពី​សប្ដាហ៍​មុន ស្នើសុំ​ឲ្យ​ធនាគារ​នេះ​បន្ត​ផ្អាក​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ប្រមាណ ២៥​លាន​ដុល្លារ​ទៅ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា ដោយសារ​តែ​វិបត្តិ​ដីធ្លី និង​ការ​បង្ខំ​ចេញ​នៅ​កម្ពុជា កំពុង​បន្ត​កើត​មាន​យ៉ាង​ធ្ងន់ធ្ងរ​នៅ​ឡើយ។

ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក បាន​ផ្អាក​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ឲ្យ​កម្ពុជា កាល​ពី​ខែ​សីហា ឆ្នាំ​២០១១ ពីព្រោះ​តែ​គោល​នយោបាយ​បង្ខំ​បណ្ដេញ​ពលរដ្ឋ​ចេញ​ពី​ផ្ទះ​សម្បែង និង​ដីធ្លី​របស់​រដ្ឋាភិបាល លោក ហ៊ុន សែន។ ប៉ុន្តែ នៅ​ពេល​ថ្មីៗ​នេះ មាន​សេចក្តី​រាយការណ៍​តាម​បណ្ដាញ​ព័ត៌មាន​ថា ធនាគារ​ចង់​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ឲ្យ​កម្ពុជា វិញ​នៅ​ខែ​ធ្នូ ខាង​មុខ​នេះ។ កាល​ពី​ខែ​សីហា ឆ្នាំ​២០១១ ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក បាន​ផ្អាក​ជា​បណ្ដោះអាសន្ន​ចំពោះ​គម្រោង​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ដល់​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ កម្ពុជា ដើម្បី​ជំទាស់​ទៅ​នឹង​គោល​នយោបាយ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា ជុំវិញ​ការ​បង្ខំ​បណ្ដេញ​ពលរដ្ឋ​ចេញ​ពី​លំនៅឋាន ដើម្បី​ឲ្យ​ក្រុមហ៊ុន​អភិវឌ្ឍ។

អតីត​នាយក​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក​ប្រចាំ​កម្ពុជា លោក អាណេត ឌិហ្សុន (Annette Dixon) សរសេរ​ក្នុង​សេចក្តី​ថ្លែងការណ៍​ថា លុះត្រា​តែ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា មាន​កិច្ច​ព្រមព្រៀង​សមស្រប​មួយ​ជាមួយ​នឹង​ពលរដ្ឋ​បឹងកក់ ពុំ​ដូច្នោះ​ទេ ធនាគារ​នឹង​មិន​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​អ្វី​ទាំងអស់​ដល់​ប្រទេស​កម្ពុជា។

លោក មូរតុន ក្លា បញ្ជាក់​ថា គោល​ជំហរ​របស់​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក ជា​ភស្តុតាង​ថ្មី​មួយ​បន្ថែម​ទៀត​បញ្ជាក់​ថា វិបត្តិ​ដីធ្លី​នៅ​កម្ពុជា មាន​សភា​ធ្ងន់ធ្ងរ​នៅ​មិន​ទាន់​អាច​ដោះស្រាយ​បាន។ លោក​ថា លិខិត​របស់​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក អាច​ផ្តល់​ទម្ងន់​បន្ថែម​ទៀត​ទៅ​ដល់​ពាក្យ​បណ្ដឹង​របស់​ជន​រងគ្រោះ​នៅ​ តុលាការ​ព្រហ្មទណ្ឌ​អន្តរជាតិ អាយស៊ីស៊ី (ICC) ដែល​បាន​ចោទ​ប្រកាន់​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា ពី​បទ​ឧក្រិដ្ឋកម្ម​ប្រឆាំង​នឹង​មនុស្ស​ជាតិ៖ «លិខិត​របស់​ធនាគារ​មាន​ ចំណុច​សំខាន់​ពីរ។ ទី​១ ព័ត៌មាន​ផ្សព្វផ្សាយ​ដែល​អះអាង​ថា ធនាគារ​នឹង​ផ្តល់​ជំនួយ​ឲ្យ​កម្ពុជា វិញ​នោះ ជា​ព័ត៌មាន​មិន​ត្រឹមត្រូវ។ ហើយ​សេចក្តី​សម្រេច​របស់​ធនាគារ​ណា​មួយ នឹង​ត្រូវ​ធ្វើ​ឡើង​ដោយ​ល្អិតល្អន់ ពាក់ព័ន្ធ​បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី ដោយ​មាន​ការ​ចូលរួម​ពី​ពលរដ្ឋ​រងគ្រោះ។ ទី​២ បង្ហាញ​ថា សហគមន៍​អន្តរជាតិ នឹង​មិន​ព្រងើយ​កន្តើយ។ សហគមន៍​ទាំង​នោះ​នឹង​បង្ខំ​ឲ្យ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា យក​ចិត្ត​ទុក​ដាក់​ដោះស្រាយ​បញ្ហា​ជម្លោះ​ដីធ្លី»

បច្ចុប្បន្ន តុលាការ​ព្រហ្មទណ្ឌ​អន្តរជាតិ កំពុង​ពិនិត្យ​ពាក្យ​បណ្ដឹង​របស់​ក្រុម​មេធាវី​អង់គ្លេស លោក រីឆាត រ៉ូជើ (Richard Rogers) ស្នើសុំ​ឲ្យ​ស៊ើប​អង្កេត​មន្ត្រី​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា ពី​បទល្មើស​ប្រឆាំង​នឹង​មនុស្ស​ជាតិ ពាក់ព័ន្ធ​នឹង​ការ​បង្ខំ​បណ្ដេញ​ពលរដ្ឋ​ចេញ​ពី​លំនៅឋាន​ដោយ​បង្ខំ។ ពាក្យ​បណ្ដឹង​នេះ មិន​បាន​ចោទ​ចំ​ឈ្មោះ​មន្ត្រី​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ឡើយ ដោយ​ស្នើ​ឲ្យ​តុលាការ​ស៊ើប​អង្កេត​ដោយ​ឯករាជ្យ។ កាល​ពី​ខែ​មីនា ឆ្នាំ​២០១៣ លោក មូរតុន ក្លា ក៏​បាន​ដាក់​ពាក្យ​បណ្ដឹង​មួយ​ប្រឆាំង​នឹង លោក ហ៊ុន សែន ជាប់​ពាក់ព័ន្ធ​នឹង​ការ​បាញ់​សម្លាប់​បាតុករ និង​ការ​បង្ខំ​បណ្ដេញ។ បច្ចុប្បន្ន តុលាការ​កំពុង​ពិនិត្យ​បណ្ដឹង​នេះ​មុន​នឹង​ស៊ើប​អង្កេត​ជា​ផ្លូវ​ការ។

លោក មូរតុន ក្លា បន្ថែម​ទៀត​ថា លិខិត​របស់​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក ក៏​បញ្ជាក់​ដែរ​ថា ដំណោះស្រាយ​របស់​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ជុំវិញ​បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី​មិន​មាន​ប្រសិទ្ធភាព ហើយ​មិន​អាច​យក​លទ្ធផល​នៃ​ការ​ដោះស្រាយ​នេះ​ទៅ​ជា​ភស្តុតាង ដើម្បី​ឲ្យ​ធនាគារ​ផ្តល់​ប្រាក់​កម្ចី​ឲ្យ​វិញ៖ «បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី​មិន​ទាន់​ អាច​បញ្ចប់​បាន​នៅ​ឡើយ​ទេ។ រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា ដោះស្រាយ​បញ្ហា​ដី​មួយ​ចំនួន​តូច​តែ​ប៉ុណ្ណោះ។ រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ត្រូវ​តែ​ដោះស្រាយ​បញ្ហា​ទាំង​នោះ​ឲ្យ​បាន​ម៉ត់ចត់ ហើយ​បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី​នេះ​ត្រូវ​មាន​ការ​ចូលរួម​ពី​សហគមន៍​អន្តរជាតិ។ ដូច្នោះ​តាម​រយៈ​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក​ផង និង​តុលាការ​ព្រហ្មទណ្ឌ​អន្តរជាតិ​ផង នឹង​បន្ត​ដាក់​គំនាប​លើ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា ដើម្បី​ចាប់​បង្ខំ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​នេះ​ឲ្យ​ដោះស្រាយ​បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី​ឲ្យ​ម៉ត់ចត់ និង​ត្រឹមត្រូវ»

មក​ទល់​ពេល​នេះ រដ្ឋាភិបាល​នៅ​មិន​ទាន់​បាន​សម្រេច​ដោះស្រាយ​ឲ្យ​ពលរដ្ឋ​នៅ​តំបន់​បឹងកក់ ឲ្យ​បាន​ចប់​សព្វគ្រប់​នៅ​ឡើយ​ទេ។ ទោះ​បី​ជា​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​សម្រេច​ផ្តល់​ដី​ប្រមាណ ១២​ហិកតារ​ទៅ​ឲ្យ​ពលរដ្ឋ​តំបន់​បឹងកក់ ប៉ុន្តែ​នៅ​មិន​ទាន់​មាន​ការ​កំណត់​ផែនទី​ដី ១២​ហិកតារ​នោះ​ឲ្យ​បាន​ច្បាស់​លាស់​នៅ​ឡើយ​ទេ។ កាល​ពី​ឆ្នាំ​២០១១ រាជ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល បាន​ចេញ​អនុក្រឹត្យ​លេខ​១៨៣ ផ្តល់​ដី​ទំហំ ១២,៤៤​ហិកតារ ដើម្បី​ឲ្យ​ប្រជាពលរដ្ឋ​អភិវឌ្ឍ​នៅ​នឹង​កន្លែង។ ប៉ុន្តែ​រហូត​មក​ទល់​ពេល​នេះ ព្រំ​ដី​ប្រជាពលរដ្ឋ​ភាគ​ច្រើន​នៅ​មិន​ទាន់​បាន​កំណត់​នៅ​ឡើយ​ទេ។

នាយក​លេខាធិការដ្ឋាន​ក្រុម​ការងារ​ពិសេស​សិទ្ធិ​លំនៅឋាន លោក សៀ ភារម្យ នៅ​ថ្ងៃ​អង្គារ ទី​២១ តុលា ស្វាគមន៍​សេចក្តី​សម្រេច​របស់​ធនាគារ​ពិភពលោក ដែល​សម្រេច​បន្ត​ផ្អាក​ប្រាក់​ជំនួយ​នៅ​កម្ពុជា។ លោក​ថា បញ្ហា​ដីធ្លី​នៅ​កម្ពុជា កំពុង​រីក​រាល​ដាល​យ៉ាង​ធ្ងន់ធ្ងរ​មិន​ទាន់​អាច​ដោះស្រាយ​បាន៖ «ការ​ ដោះស្រាយ​នោះ​ហាក់​មាន​ដូចជា​មាន​ការ​យឺតយ៉ាវ ជាពិសេស​ពលរដ្ឋ​មិន​សូវ​ពេញ​ចិត្ត​នឹង​ដំណោះស្រាយ ហើយ​និង រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ត្រូវ​ខិតខំ​បន្ថែម​ទៀត​ឲ្យ​ពលរដ្ឋ​ពេញ​ចិត្ត​នឹង​ដំណោះស្រាយ ហើយ​ឲ្យ​ពលរដ្ឋ​អាច​ស្នើសុំ​ឲ្យ​ធនាគារ​ភ្ជាប់​លុយ​មក​កម្ពុជា វិញ»

មន្ត្រី​នាំ​ពាក្យ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល និង​ជា​រដ្ឋមន្ត្រី​ក្រសួង​ព័ត៌មាន លោក ខៀវ កាញារីទ្ធ មិន​ទាន់​ឆ្លើយ​តប​នឹង​សំណួរ​វិទ្យុ​អាស៊ីសេរី នៅ​ថ្ងៃ​ទី​២១ តុលា នៅ​ឡើយ​ទេ។

ឯកសារ​សិក្សា​របស់​អង្គការ​ក្រៅ​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​ជាតិ និង​អន្តរជាតិ​បង្ហាញ​ថា ពលរដ្ឋ​ខ្មែរ​ប្រមាណ ៧​សែន ៧​ម៉ឺន​នាក់ ត្រូវ​បាន​បង្ខំ​បណ្ដេញ​ចេញ​ពី​ផ្ទះ​សម្បែង និង​ដីធ្លី​ពី​ផ្ទៃ​ដី​ប្រមាណ ៤៩​លាន​ហិកតារ ស្មើ​នឹង​ទំហំ​នឹង​ប្រទេស​អេស្ប៉ាញ (Spain)។ ឯកសារ​បង្ហាញ​ទៀត​ថា មន្ត្រី​មាន​អំណាច​រដ្ឋាភិបាល​កម្ពុជា បាន​ប្រើប្រាស់​យុទ្ធនាការ​ទ្រង់ទ្រាយ​ធំ​រួម​មាន ការ​ធ្វើ​ឃាត ការ​ចាប់​ឃុំ​ខ្លួន​ដាក់​ពន្ធនាគារ រំលោភ​ផ្លូវ​ភេទ និង​គំរាម​កំហែង​ប្រឆាំង​ទៅ​នឹង​ពលរដ្ឋ​ណា​ដែល​ហ៊ាន​ចេញ​មុខ​តវ៉ា​ពី​ការ​ បង្ខំ​បណ្ដេញ​ចេញ៕


Land Communities Take On World Bank

September 19, 2014

By Mech Rara, The Cambodia Daily, 19 September 2014

English4


Protesters Converge on Firm Buying Boeng Kak Land

August 22, 2014

By Mech Dara And Zsombor Peter, The Cambodia Daily, 19 August 2014

English2


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